LUXFLAG Style Guide

Typography

Work Sans

Work Sans is a typeface family based loosely on early Grotesques, such as those by Stephenson Blake, Miller & Richard and Bauerschen Giesserei. The Regular weight and others in the middle of the family are optimised for on-screen text usage at medium-sizes (14px-48px) and can also be used in print design. The fonts closer to the extreme weights are designed more for display use both on the web and in print. Overall, features are simplified and optimised for screen resolutions; for example, diacritic marks are larger than how they would be in print.

Source: https://fonts.google.com/specimen/Work+Sans

DISPLAY HEADERS

ABCDEFGHIJKLM NOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklm nopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890

HEADERS

ABCDEFGHIJKLM NOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklm nopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890

BODY TEXT

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus ut feugiat arcu. Aenean a justo nec velit pellentesque sagittis fringilla mattis quam. Cras venenatis purus id ligula eleifend, ac venenatis elit eleifend. Aenean vestibulum magna quis purus ornare, non fermentum ante gravida. Curabitur lobortis urna sapien, vel egestas metus pharetra quis.

Header 1

Header 2

Header 3

Header 4

Header 5
Header 6

Header 4

Lato is a sans serif typeface family started in the summer of 2010 by Warsaw-based designer Łukasz Dziedzic (“Lato” means “Summer” in Polish). In December 2010 the Lato family was published under the Open Font License by his foundry tyPoland, with support from Google.

In the last ten or so years, during which Łukasz has been designing type, most of his projects were rooted in a particular design task that he needed to solve. With Lato, it was no different. Originally, the family was conceived as a set of corporate fonts for a large client — who in the end decided to go in different stylistic direction, so the family became available for a public release.

When working on Lato, Łukasz tried to carefully balance some potentially conflicting priorities. He wanted to create a typeface that would seem quite “transparent” when used in body text but would display some original traits when used in larger sizes. He used classical proportions (particularly visible in the uppercase) to give the letterforms familiar harmony and elegance. At the same time, he created a sleek sans serif look, which makes evident the fact that Lato was designed in 2010 — even though it does not follow any current trend.

Source: https://fonts.google.com/specimen/Lato

Colors

#5CF7B6
#eefff7
#eeeeee
#ffffff
#252645
#000000
#d95959

Buttons